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In our household we have two bathtub problems: mold in the one and impossible-to-remove shampoo residue in the other.
Normal cleaning gets most of the mold off…but I flat out would have to yank out the grout to get some spots clean. Since we’re in military housing, I don’t think they would appreciate this. In addition, this careful scrubbing to get off the mold without killing our prehistoric grout takes a LONG time.

Onto the second problem in our household. This is embarrassing (I really don’t want to admit to the world my scalp issues, but I need to explain why my one bathtub looks clay-colored). My nasty scalp requires this special prescription shampoo that is the color of clay and about as hard to get off. I splash water and wipe down the tub as often as I remember after bathing. I also tried regular cleaner. In fact, the “before” pictures are AFTER I’ve cleaned the tub. Trust me, this stuff sticks!

In this bathtub, the clay stuff not only sticks to the grout in the back part (where I sit when I shampoo my hair); it sticks to the entire bottom of the shampoo up to the water level of the tub. (Yes, this stuff is stubborn!).  Isn’t it horrible?

Then I saw a picture (on Pinterest) of long cotton coils pressed on grout. I thought “OMG! The solution!” To give me due credit, I had thought of cotton balls, but as I pictured myself lining up 100 cotton balls and soaking them in bleach, I decided that might be a bit ridiculous.Disclaimer: Here is the part where I say “hey! Make sure you use gloves and are in a well-ventilated space.” It’s also where I confess: I turned on the bathroom fan, but as quick as it was, I simply subjected my hands to the bleach. They’re fine; they’ll survive.

Yes, this was after scrubbing. That clay-like shampoo I used did NOT come off with normal cleaner.
Yes, this was after scrubbing. That clay-like shampoo I used did NOT come off with normal cleaner.
Bathtub bottom AFTER scrubbing. As I said, this stuff was impossible to remove.
Bathtub bottom AFTER scrubbing. As I said, this stuff was impossible to remove.

Here is the solution. You’re going to need: Clorox bleach and long cotton coils. You can find these at beauty stores or order them off Amazon. I used Amazon because I’m lazy and I have prime so there is no shipping charge. (No, neither Clorox or Amazon are paying me for using their names!)

Break off foot-long or so pieces of cotton. Soak in bleach. Wring out about half-way; it shouldn’t be dripping, but it does need to be fairly wet. Place along edges, tucking in well.

Leave it overnight.

The next day, pull it off and splash some water to clean off the bleach residue. I would say “wipe it off” but I said no scrubbing.

Yes, that’s it. Completely, 100% the entire process.

The magic ingredients: Clorox bleach and long cotton coils.
The magic ingredients: Clorox bleach and long cotton coils.
Soak the coils in bleach.
Soak the coils in bleach.
Line coils along the edge over the grout.
Line coils along the edge over the grout.
I used a thin white cloth soaked and layered it over the bottom. It did not work as well as the coils, but did have an effect.
I used a thin white cloth soaked and layered it over the bottom. It did not work as well as the coils, but did have an effect.

Finals:

Bright and shiny grout!
Bright and shiny grout!
As you can see the bottom isn't perfect...but it's much better compared to the "before" pictures.
As you can see the bottom isn't perfect...but it's much better compared to the "before" pictures.